Author Topic: VonStern Magazine  (Read 132852 times)

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Offline EVS

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« Last Edit: December 04, 2011, 06:24:30 pm by EVS »


Offline EVS

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Re: VonStern Magazine
« Reply #182 on: January 10, 2012, 09:31:29 pm »

http://www.thebulletin.org

"Doomsday Clock moves to five minutes to midnight
 10 January 2012

It is five minutes to midnight. Two years ago, it appeared that world leaders might address the truly global threats that we face. In many cases, that trend has not continued or been reversed. For that reason, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists is moving the clock hand one minute closer to midnight, back to its time in 2007."


For more information:

http://www.thebulletin.org/content/media-center/announcements/2012/01/10/doomsday-clock-moves-to-five-minutes-to-midnight

EVS

Offline EVS

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Re: VonStern Magazine
« Reply #183 on: January 15, 2012, 01:27:24 am »
Just for your information, I've today opened up a new forum, and I hope
all of you here will register. I hope we all this way still can keep our acquaintances
as I find this group of ours to be a very special, yet small corner of the 'Net.

I hope to see all of you here:

http://evs4u.conforums.com

You are welcome to join, and this sure doesn't mean that you have to leave the DRT forum,
I'll be here too....but if anything like what happened to the OMF should occur here, we sure should have a place to
meet after that...

EVS
« Last Edit: January 15, 2012, 05:10:15 am by EVS »

The Leviathan

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Re: VonStern Magazine
« Reply #184 on: January 15, 2012, 03:20:45 am »
EXCELLENT.  I have added your forum to my Blog suggested sites.  EXCELLENT.
L E V I A T H A N

Offline majicbar

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Re: VonStern Magazine
« Reply #185 on: January 15, 2012, 06:43:01 pm »
Just for your information, I've today opened up a new forum, and I hope
all of you here will register. I hope we all this way still can keep our acquaintances
as I find this group of ours to be a very special, yet small corner of the 'Net.

I hope to see all of you here:

http://evs4u.conforums.com

You are welcome to join, and this sure doesn't mean that you have to leave the DRT forum,
I'll be here too....but if anything like what happened to the OMF should occur here, we sure should have a place to
meet after that...

EVS

Ah???? There is nowhere in the registration to put a password and without that password one cannot logon. SPEEDBUMP!

(Password setup mailed to e-mail, changed in profile so now everything is just fine, thanks!)
« Last Edit: January 16, 2012, 03:34:50 am by majicbar »

Offline EVS

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Re: VonStern Magazine
« Reply #186 on: March 25, 2012, 09:50:32 pm »
The Space Between Atoms

The Space Between Atoms

You wouldn't know it to look at it, but the atoms that make up a solid piece of iron contain more space than stuff. How is it then that the whole world doesn't just crumble around us? This video segment adapted from A Science Odyssey uses models, vivid descriptions, and analogies to explain the structural integrity of matter at the atomic level.

EVS

Offline EVS

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Re: VonStern Magazine
« Reply #187 on: March 26, 2012, 12:48:40 am »
Full feature movie about time, and how it might be, is available here:

http://evs4u.conforums.com/index.cgi?board=SPC&action=display&num=1332714566&start=0#1332714566

Takes about 1 hour of your time, but I assure you, it's worth every second of your time.

EVS

Offline EVS

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Re: VonStern Magazine
« Reply #188 on: April 13, 2012, 10:48:50 pm »
http://www.chembio.uoguelph.ca/educmat/atomdata/bindener/elecbind.htm

Binding Energies of Electrons
in Atoms from H (Z=1) to Lw (Z=103)

An electron, which is negatively charged, is attracted to the nucleus of an atom because of the positive charge that is there. The amount of energy that is required to be given to the electron to pull it away from this attractive (Coulombic) force is called the binding energy. For the hydrogen atom, this is an exactly solvable problem (both at the non-relativistic level -the Schršdinger equation- and at the relativistic level -the Dirac equation). However, when more than one electron is present in orbit around a nucleus one most further consider the electrostatic repulsion which arises between the electrons. Because of this additional repulsion, the energy one needs to give a certain electron to remove it from the nucleus is now less than would be needed otherwise. This electron-electron repulsion makes the problem unsolvable analytically. However, many effective and accurate numerical methods have been developed to calculate the binding energies including these additional terms.

--o0o--

http://library.thinkquest.org/17940/texts/binding_energy/binding_energy.html


Binding Energy


The key concept behind the release of energy in fusion (and fission) reactions is binding energy. Binding energy is the energy that is lost when a nucleus is created from protons and neutrons. If you added up the total mass of the nucleons (protons and neutrons) that compose an atom, you would notice that this sum is less than the actual mass of the atom. This missing mass, called the mass defect, is a measure of the atom's binding energy. It is released during the formation of a nucleus from the composing nucleons. This energy would have to be put back into the nucleus in order to decompose it into its individual nucleons. The greater the binding energy per nucleon in the atom, the greater the atom's stability. To calculate the binding energy of a nucleus, all you have to do is sum the mass of the individual nucleons, and then subtract the mass of the atom itself. The mass leftover is then converted into its energy equivalent. The relation between mass and energy is shown in Einstein's famous equation E = mc2. However, we will just multiply the mass by a conversion factor to have the units of energy in millions of electron volts (MeV), a standard unit of energy in nuclear physics. Therefore, the equation for binding energy that you can use later is:


Eb = (Z Ã? mH + N Ã? mn - misotope) Ã? 931.5 MeV/amu
 

--o0o--

http://authors.library.caltech.edu/5204/

--o0o--

EVS
« Last Edit: April 13, 2012, 10:50:03 pm by EVS »

Offline EVS

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Re: VonStern Magazine
« Reply #189 on: April 13, 2012, 10:53:14 pm »
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=atoms-of-space-and-time

http://straddle3.net/context/03/en/2003_02_26.html

http://www.phys.lsu.edu/faculty/pullin/sciam.pdf

So, you see...our Universe might be a collaboration of tiny particles...

Each with it's own destiny...something to think about... :D

EVS
« Last Edit: April 14, 2012, 12:47:56 am by EVS »

Offline EVS

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Re: VonStern Magazine
« Reply #190 on: April 13, 2012, 11:05:19 pm »
If time is a constant in the Universe, what we really do not know, why might it not be another way of travelling through the Universe? We really do not know. Time as we know it, ages all physical matter (and ourselves) here on this planet, but can time also have a side to it, that only occurs outside our safe environment here on the Earth? How does time work when in space? Light travels at app. 300.000 kilometers a second, as we have measured it here, in our environment. How can we be sure that time follows light speed in space? What if time is "relative", and changes when a black hole is in it's way? What actually happens to time? Is it the same  thing that happens to light when it can't escape a black hole? We sure don't know, but something suggests that time might be relative too, just as light bends, time might bend too, in the great Cosmos.

Just another mindbender,

EVS

Offline majicbar

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Re: VonStern Magazine
« Reply #191 on: April 14, 2012, 11:57:47 pm »
I would think that time still needs to exist within a black hole or the gravity would not work right and the black hole would not work like it is supposed to. If time inside the black hole slows to nearly nothing then the gravity of the black hole would increase, at least locally, but then what would that do to any definition for time? My best guess is that time is not changed or modified, I think Relativity is wrong on that. All good observations of time slowing down have been on the quantum level, not the cosmological level.

Offline EVS

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Re: VonStern Magazine
« Reply #192 on: April 15, 2012, 06:31:16 pm »
majicbar, it's just that NASA has detected a diversion in time, between the time recorded in space, and the time here on Earth...

I'll later post the discovery, I thank you for your input! It's valuable insight!

In the mean time, please take a look at this:

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2011/04may_epic/

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/universe/blackhole_surfing.html

EVS
« Last Edit: April 15, 2012, 10:41:23 pm by EVS »

Offline tomi

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Re: VonStern Magazine
« Reply #193 on: April 16, 2012, 12:54:02 am »
The GPS system is always adjusted to account for the changes in time based on general relativity.  This is known for ages now.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spacetime

......The satellite clocks are moving at 14,000 km/hr in orbits that circle the Earth twice per day, much faster than clocks on the surface of the Earth, and Einstein's theory of special relativity says that rapidly moving clocks tick more slowly, by about seven microseconds (millionths of a second) per day.

Also, the orbiting clocks are 20,000 km above the Earth, and experience gravity that is four times weaker than that on the ground. Einstein's general relativity theory says that gravity curves space and time, resulting in a tendency for the orbiting clocks to tick slightly faster, by about 45 microseconds per day. The net result is that time on a GPS satellite clock advances faster than a clock on the ground by about 38 microseconds per day.



« Last Edit: April 16, 2012, 12:55:59 am by tomi »

Offline tomi

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Re: VonStern Magazine
« Reply #194 on: April 16, 2012, 08:16:20 am »
This is a good film explaining spacetime.

Time Trip - BBC Horizon
Everyone experiences time differently  ;D