Author Topic: Palo Alto Xerox PARC - The tip of the iceberg  (Read 18261 times)

0 Members and 5 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline elevenaugust

  • Administrator
  • Hero Dronie #3
  • **********
  • Posts: 1230
  • Karma: +34/-1
  • א ב ג ד ה ו ז ח ט י כ ך ל מ ם נ ן ס ע פ ף צ ץ ק ר
Palo Alto Xerox PARC - The tip of the iceberg
« on: August 29, 2008, 10:02:42 PM »
Palo Alto, Xerox entrance.

An original document from PARC, 1974.
"Memo about draft Ethernet overview"

The computer model Isaac probably used at PACL:
The Xerox 8010 (aka "Star") ;D
Historical documents here.

IPACO, the new tool for photo and video analysis is on-line! www.ipaco.fr

Offline Arkhangels

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Dronie
  • **********
  • Posts: 99
  • Karma: +21/-0
  • ~~"Flying around"~~
Re: Palo Alto Xerox PARC - The tip of the iceberg
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2008, 11:56:50 PM »
Holy sh*t!
When I first read that page in the monitor I swear I saw the ISAAC language in there!
 :o

Then I found the same image with a higher resolution
http://www.digibarn.com/collections/systems/xerox-8010/xerox-star-8010-large.jpg

High quality(Photoshop format): http://www.digibarn.com/friends/curbow/star/hiRes/image1.psd
Other HQ image (PS format): http://www.digibarn.com/friends/curbow/star/hiRes/image2.psd

The top of the page says:
From the Japanese computer journar "ASCII"

The right side of the image is the following text, found in the same website that Eleven posted:
http://www.digibarn.com/friends/curbow/star/CloudMud.html
With one or other difference... I'll type what I read there in the monitor based in that link:

PS: what is inside parenthesis is what isn't present in the text seen in the monitor, but is present in the historical document. The monitor text reaches a point where we are unable to see the rest, so it goes unchecked.

(Star Arrives in Japan
From the Japanese computer journal ASCII, December 1981:
Text supplied by Joe Becker, Xerox.)

The greatest news of Data Show (81) was the announcement (by Fuji Xerox) of the Xerox Information Network System XINS. From the way in which not only the Data Show attendees but also the other makers exhitors were riveted to the (Fuji Xerox) display booth, it is fair to say that both attendees and exhibitors received a great shock.

In developing this personal computer, Xerox tore out the former methods of computer usage by the roots, and devised an epoch-making system. ... Having thus developed the personal computer and local network systems, Xerox announced an office distributed processing system one step away from the dream personal computer, the workstation on the Ethernet, at the May 81 NCC in Chicago.
This is the XEROX 8010 STAR information system. Naturally, it goes without saying that the attention of the computer people of the world was focused on this system. (In the basic configuration of 192K bytes of main memory, one 1.2 M-byte 8-inch floppy, and one 10 M-Byte rigid disk, it has the astonishing price of 4 million yen. Comparing Star with Japanese computer makers office computers in the 4 million yen class, their capabilities are as different as clouds from mud. Men from the Japanese makers stood nodding, ashen-faced, before the Xerox booth at the Data Show.

This presentation aimed at the most dramatic effect; it seemed to stun [literally: to disembowel] the other exhibitors.

Last updated December 4, 1999.)



To me this is clearly the first connection between: Japanese language - PARC, then it would go, PARC - PACL - ISAAC language

Resized image of the monitor (taken from the high res. image1.psd):

Original imagem of the monitor (taken from the high res. image2.psd):


PS: Thanks for the data Eleven, and good find  ;D
Regards
Ark
« Last Edit: August 30, 2008, 05:41:08 PM by Arkhangels »

Whoooooo

Offline Douglas

  • Hero Dronie #1
  • *******
  • Posts: 405
  • Karma: +36/-4
Re: Palo Alto Xerox PARC - The tip of the iceberg
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2008, 09:00:55 PM »
Thanx Eleven for posting the photos of PARC. Very good work and research!

This is where Dr. Keith Edwards said he worked for eight years.  Remember,  he's the guy who stated in two resumes that he worked on ALIEN artifacts at this location.  Also he stated on his resume that he further had contact and confirmation concerning ALIEN artifacts when he visited Europe.

OMF bought his denials as they would  but you and I know better.  PhD.s do not joke about such things on their official resumes.  In fact he was bragging.

Do you think this is actually where Isaac worked?  And that the name was changed on the building or taken over by XEROX?  I have the feeling that is true.

Also when you look at the site plan it appears that this collection of buildings has been enlarged in stages.  And that the current configuation is much larger than the original complex.  It appears that four buildings  have been added on three sides of the central building.

« Last Edit: August 30, 2008, 09:10:46 PM by Douglas »

Offline majicbar

  • Major Dronie
  • ******
  • Posts: 226
  • Karma: +24/-3
Re: Palo Alto Xerox PARC - The tip of the iceberg
« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2008, 05:51:09 AM »
This is interesting. If Edwards was not serious, he is an idiot. If he is to be taken seriously he would have to be honest in saying this, but then from what we've seen elsewhere you never really know how some minds are working.

http://www2.parc.com/csl/members/kedwards/default-parc.html

Ed...OK, I have to buy "IDIOT", see post at ATS

http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread289007/pg92

But then again it appears that in 1999 he was a speaker at the:

 "10th Great UFO/ET Alien & Abduction Congress (with) ... Dannion Brinkley, David Hatcher Childress, Bob Dratch, Dr. Randall Eaton, Keith Edwards,...(more)"

see:   http://www.paradigmresearchgroup.org/conferences_past_1999.html

So, was he just joking at the conference too? Voyure, or vandal? In the programe description it says... "Want info?  ^",  WHOA!
 

« Last Edit: August 31, 2008, 06:47:35 AM by majicbar »

Offline Douglas

  • Hero Dronie #1
  • *******
  • Posts: 405
  • Karma: +36/-4
Re: Palo Alto Xerox PARC - The tip of the iceberg
« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2008, 06:29:10 AM »
Dr Edwards is a smarty pants PhD. mathematics nerd type who flouts the concept we normally call TOP SECRET.  Many civilians who work on alien artifacts share his opinion about the label TOP SECRET.      He could care less what people think of him and his work on ALIEN artifacts.

He even reports that he sent a request for the US Government report on Roswell. 

The bottom line is:  Dr. Edwards worked at PARC and he also had access to alien artifacts.  He just likes to brag about it and he got caught. 

He sent me the same email that is referenced in the link.   

DOUGLAS

Offline EVS

  • Administrator
  • Hero Dronie #2
  • **********
  • Posts: 538
  • Karma: +26/-0
Re: Palo Alto Xerox PARC - The tip of the iceberg
« Reply #5 on: August 31, 2008, 09:01:16 AM »
Public history of "Unicode" at the time "Isaac" supposedly worked at PACL:

http://www.unicode.org/history/tenyears.html (No longer available)

1985-1987
During this period of time, in addition to his co-authoring of Apple KanjiTalk, Davis was involved in further discussions of a universal character set which were being prompted by the development of the Apple File Exchange.

â??We [at Xerox PARC] decided to put a Japanese system on Alto (the prototype personal computer) with Fuji Xerox [1975]. It was the first personal computer built at Xerox PARC. It was the model that Steve Jobs used [for the first Apple machine].  Thousands were built, none sold. We needed a 16-bit [character encoding]. Joe Becker came up with the initial 16-bit. This was for the Xerox STAR product [1981], which was truly multilingual.  I managed the JDS product in STAR. Star went on to 27 languages, including Japanese, Chinese and English."

At Xerox, Huan-mei Liao, Nelson Ng, Dave Opstad, and Lee Collins began work on a database to map the relationships between identical Japanese (JIS) and Chinese (simplified and traditional) characters for quickly building a font for extended Chinese characters. Xerox users (e.g. Nakajima of the University of Toronto) were using JIS to extend the Xerox Chinese character set and vice versa.  This opens the discussion of Han unification.

Addendum:

http://www.unicode.org/charts/

http://www.decodeunicode.org/
« Last Edit: December 26, 2011, 12:51:04 AM by EVS »

Offline EVS

  • Administrator
  • Hero Dronie #2
  • **********
  • Posts: 538
  • Karma: +26/-0
Re: Palo Alto Xerox PARC - The tip of the iceberg
« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2008, 06:13:47 PM »
Just for the record:

Katakana is not the language of "Isaac"!

But we're on the track, until I get to work out the factual evidence, take a look at this:

(Urls removed as they no longer exists)

Linguistics researchers at the Xerox Research Centre Europe (XRCE) and at the Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) have long been leading forces in automation of natural language processing. Fruits of their laboratory researches have been harvested to feed into practical and usable products. The latest product is the Xerox Engine for Linguistic Dependent Applications (XeLDA) which profits from decades of Xerox linguistic research, providing a general-purpose natural language processing engine, packaged in an open and modular multi-platform client/server computing environment.

EVS

« Last Edit: December 26, 2011, 12:56:12 AM by EVS »

Offline majicbar

  • Major Dronie
  • ******
  • Posts: 226
  • Karma: +24/-3
Re: Palo Alto Xerox PARC - The tip of the iceberg
« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2008, 01:02:26 PM »

What kind of work was being done at XEROX PARC in 1992: study of self assembly which might be applicable to space exploration. Implies nano-scalar materials like those that might be operable in a drone.

http://www.zyvex.com/nanotech/selfRepJBIS.html

Offline Douglas

  • Hero Dronie #1
  • *******
  • Posts: 405
  • Karma: +36/-4
Re: Palo Alto Xerox PARC - The tip of the iceberg
« Reply #8 on: September 11, 2008, 10:11:17 PM »

What kind of work was being done at XEROX PARC in 1992: study of self assembly which might be applicable to space exploration. Implies nano-scalar materials like those that might be operable in a drone.

http://www.zyvex.com/nanotech/selfRepJBIS.html

Below are two quotes from Dr. Keith Edwards PhD. Resume.  This gives us a clue as to what he was working on at PARC in the early 1990s.  He worked at PARC for 8 years.

Quote:
Iâ??m probably in some government file someplace because I ordered the Roswell Report online. You can have a file on yourself too [ Ed. no longer available].   I work at PARC, where we actually get to use a lot of the technology that our government got from the small greys in the abductee-for-flying-saucer swap that followed Roswell. I also encountered evidence of alien visitation on my trip to Eastern Europe .


Before that, I worked on the Placeless Documents System, which isâ??in a nutshellâ??a â??radically extensibleâ? document management system. That makes it sound far more boring than it actually is. A better description might be that itâ??s a system that manages a collection of distributed information sources by overlaying a prototype-based object system on them. Iâ??ve also been working on Flatland, a framework for creating pen-based applications for large surfaces like whiteboards (sorry, no page yet). One of my main projects used to be time travel (sort of) and its applications to collaboration.

Iâ??ve also worked on a number of other projects at PARC, including Bayou, a weakly-consistent replicated data store for applications with sporadic network connectivity. [end of quote]

Dr. Edwards also worked on a type of computer that could be in any part of a room.  You walk into a room and the computer and keyboard could be anywhere you desired.  Every part of the computer is a projection.  The keyboard and computer screen is a projection.  There is no visible hardware.  The screen could be floating [invisible] in the middle of the room and the keyboard could be projected on a coffee table, your shirt, the bed, anywhere there is a surface.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2008, 10:17:29 PM by Douglas »

Offline onthefence

  • Administrator
  • Hero Dronie #3
  • **********
  • Posts: 1045
  • Karma: +50/-0
Re: Palo Alto Xerox PARC - The tip of the iceberg
« Reply #9 on: December 22, 2011, 08:28:00 PM »
A current events story about PARC:

The Comeback of Xerox PARC
http://www.technologyreview.com/business/39222/

"For most of its 40-year history, PARC (for Palo Alto Research Center) was as famous for squandering new technologies as it was for inventing them."

Offline Douglas

  • Hero Dronie #1
  • *******
  • Posts: 405
  • Karma: +36/-4
Re: Palo Alto Xerox PARC - The tip of the iceberg
« Reply #10 on: December 24, 2011, 03:32:48 AM »
A current events story about PARC:

The Comeback of Xerox PARC
http://www.technologyreview.com/business/39222/

"For most of its 40-year history, PARC (for Palo Alto Research Center) was as famous for squandering new technologies as it was for inventing them."

Let's recall that this is where Dr. Keith Edwards worked and told us he had access to alien technology from Roswell.   You can read all about him in the Reference below on this site..!!

Douglas
Ref:
http://droneteam.com/drt/index.php?topic=307.0

Offline danblast

  • Founding Dronie
  • *****
  • Posts: 155
  • Karma: +6/-15
Re: Palo Alto Xerox PARC - The tip of the iceberg
« Reply #11 on: December 24, 2011, 10:04:33 PM »
Interesting. Let's hope we see more in 2012.

Issacc where are you?  ;)

Offline onthefence

  • Administrator
  • Hero Dronie #3
  • **********
  • Posts: 1045
  • Karma: +50/-0
Re: Palo Alto Xerox PARC - The tip of the iceberg
« Reply #12 on: October 22, 2014, 09:51:11 PM »
Some chatter about the computer that "Isaac" likely referred to, the Xerox Alto and the newly released  source code ... who knows what goodies may reside in there  :o

Link to the article at computerhistory.org:
http://www.computerhistory.org/_static/atchm/xerox-alto-source-code/

Quote
"The first Altos were built as research prototypes. Ultimately about 1500 of them were built and deployed throughout the Xerox Corporation, as well as at universities and other sites. But this groundbreaking machine was never sold as a product; its legacy is as inspiration for what followed."

Clearly an inspiration for someone.