Author Topic: Isaac  (Read 27189 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline knowhow

  • Full Dronie
  • ***
  • Posts: 41
  • Karma: +4/-0
  • Retired Engr'g Mgr, programmer, pilot,musician
Online Business Search in California
« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2008, 05:19:25 PM »
There is an online search where you can search for businesses in California
http://kepler.sos.ca.gov/list.html

I entered Palo Alto Caret Laboratory and nothing came back.
I put in just Palo Alto Laboratory and two came back.  One the existing fxpal and one that had been dissolved named Palo Alto Physicians Laboratory formed in 1967 and dissolved sometime in the past.  The address was different than the fxpal address area.

If one does a search in Google, there are hundreds if not thousands relating to the UFO materials but very little having to do with caret.  Of those that are involved with caret, it is the graphic character, and not c.a.r.e.t.
knowhow

Offline onthefence

  • Administrator
  • Hero Dronie #3
  • **********
  • Posts: 1045
  • Karma: +50/-0
Re: Isaac
« Reply #16 on: July 22, 2008, 02:09:47 PM »
For reference, this image of the LAP naming by organelle (OMF):

Offline spinnewise

  • Founding Dronie
  • *****
  • Posts: 117
  • Karma: +19/-0
Re: Isaac
« Reply #17 on: July 24, 2008, 09:52:56 PM »
I have noticed something in the PACL report.
If you compare the same letters like all small e's, you will see differences. No two are exactly the same - as they should be if they were computer printed.
In my opinion this is strong evidence for old fashioned typeset, where each letter is a unique piece of metal.
greetings spinnewise
Still looking for gorillas

Offline spinnewise

  • Founding Dronie
  • *****
  • Posts: 117
  • Karma: +19/-0
Re: Isaac
« Reply #18 on: July 24, 2008, 09:58:53 PM »
I was trained in technical drawing in the seventies when you still had to do it by hand. In the LAP drawing I can see evidence of old fashioned inkpen drawing made by a plotter. Isaacs story of its making is absolutly believable for me.
Still looking for gorillas

Offline nekitamo

  • Administrator
  • Major Dronie
  • **********
  • Posts: 224
  • Karma: +28/-0
Re: Isaac
« Reply #19 on: September 05, 2008, 09:33:21 AM »
Not sure if someone already noticed this, but there is a repeating bar-code pattern that is present in multiple parts of the LAP:



There are also many symbol patterns that are repeated in various size and/or orientation:

« Last Edit: September 05, 2008, 10:18:08 AM by nekitamo »

Offline elevenaugust

  • Administrator
  • Hero Dronie #3
  • **********
  • Posts: 1231
  • Karma: +34/-1
  • א ב ג ד ה ו ז ח ט י כ ך ל מ ם נ ן ס ע פ ף צ ץ ק ר
Re: Isaac
« Reply #20 on: September 05, 2008, 03:26:12 PM »
Yes, Neki; I already noticed that last year in my study of the LAP in OMF.
Nobody at the time find it relevant.

It could be the sign of some common useful function of the concerned nodes.
IPACO, the new tool for photo and video analysis is on-line! www.ipaco.fr

Offline leviathan

  • Major Dronie
  • ******
  • Posts: 290
  • Karma: +22/-0
    • L E V I A T H A N
Re: Isaac
« Reply #21 on: September 05, 2008, 03:42:55 PM »
Now this is research and thinking without the dictatorship of Mods.  The LAP has always looked like the product of a HP Engineering Plotter produced on roll vellum plotter paper to me.  Elevenaugust, your findings are always relevant here and to me.
L E V I A T H A N
We at L E V I A T H A N were banned from the UFO Casebook Forum and it is so sad.
http://livyatan.blogspot.com/

Offline Douglas

  • Hero Dronie #1
  • *******
  • Posts: 405
  • Karma: +36/-4
Re: Isaac
« Reply #22 on: September 05, 2008, 07:49:30 PM »
Now this is research and thinking without the dictatorship of Mods.  The LAP has always looked like the product of a HP Engineering Plotter produced on roll vellum plotter paper to me.  Elevenaugust, your findings are always relevant here and to me.
L E V I A T H A N

Lev:    Didn't Isaac clearly state that it took many people months to make the LAP documents?  This proves it had to be done old-school using an Engineering Plotter on vellum.

If it was made last year it could be done in days using computer CAMCAD software and by one person.

Douglas.............
« Last Edit: September 05, 2008, 07:53:56 PM by Douglas »

Offline EVS

  • Administrator
  • Hero Dronie #2
  • **********
  • Posts: 538
  • Karma: +26/-0
Re: Isaac
« Reply #23 on: September 05, 2008, 08:20:55 PM »
Now this is research and thinking without the dictatorship of Mods.  The LAP has always looked like the product of a HP Engineering Plotter produced on roll vellum plotter paper to me.  Elevenaugust, your findings are always relevant here and to me.
L E V I A T H A N

Lev:    Didn't Isaac clearly state that it took many people months to make the LAP documents?  This proves it had to be done old-school using an Engineering Plotter on vellum.

If it was made last year it could be done in days using computer CAMCAD software and by one person.

Douglas.............

Douglas, you're quite right...

The LAP surely was made by a Xerox Plotter (PACL was a part of Xerox):

 http://www.xerox.com/go/xrx/template/019d.jsp?view=Factbook&id=MajorProdUSAnnounce&Xcntry=USA&Xlang=en_US
 
1983
1035: Second copier in the 10 Series which is the only copier to offer preset modes of both reduction and enlargement; 20 copies per minute.
1810 Portable Computer: Fits in a briefcase and operates up to 10 hours on rechargeable batteries.

ECP 42: The first large-format digital color plotter.

 
 
1984
1055: Heavily featured copier that offers automatic two-sided copying with second side image shift and variable reduction and enlargement; 50 copies per minute.
9900: Duplicator with computerized programming, two-sided copying, stapling and job storage; 120 copies per minute.

FaxMaster: First software for integration of fax and computer.

 
 
1985
6085 Professional Computer System: Sophisticated workstation also runs various software programs.
1090: First Xerox high-volume copier handles a variety of originals, reduces/enlarges and makes two-sided copies; 92 copies per minute.

XPS 700 Series: Publishing systems include terminals for editing and design pagination, composition software, connections to electronic printers.

 
 
1986
4020: Color inkjet printer that produces documents with integrated test and high-resolution graphics in seven colors.
990 Viewer/Printer: Makes prints as large as 18 by 24 inches from 35mm microfilm aperture cards or roll film.

2510: Engineering copier produces copies up to 36 inches wide on paper, vellum or polyester film.

1012: Desktop copier with an industry-first, three-year warranty; 15 copies per minute.

9790: High-volume laser printer with high-capacity disk storage and central processing power to print merged text and graphics; 120 prints per minute.

1005: Color copier reduces/enlarges; 5 full-color copies per minute.

Conference Copier: Allows one person to take notes for everyone at a meeting using a writing board linked to copier; 99 copies at a time.

7020: First Xerox fax machine to use ordinary, cut-sheet paper; also functions as a copier with automatic speed dial.

CE 3000: Large-format digital color printer.

 
 
1987
1065: Fully featured mid-volume copier; 62 copies per minute.
Pro Scan System: Computer system scans in technical drawings and maps, allowing them to be edited on the screen and then printed or stored electronically.
 
EVS
« Last Edit: September 05, 2008, 09:00:51 PM by EVS »

Offline EVS

  • Administrator
  • Hero Dronie #2
  • **********
  • Posts: 538
  • Karma: +26/-0
Re: Isaac
« Reply #24 on: September 05, 2008, 08:39:49 PM »
Not sure if someone already noticed this, but there is a repeating bar-code pattern that is present in multiple parts of the LAP:



There are also many symbol patterns that are repeated in various size and/or orientation:



Good findings, it requires some next level thinking (very much like yours) to even try to understand "alien tech"!  :D

The consistant operation schematics you've found, might show the communication inbetween parts of the operational outlay, every part will need a reference point.

If you send a message, it has to have a reciever, and vice versa.

Communication between sources and working adhesives.

EVS

PS: The layout of the LAP is quite similar to the layouts for other Xerox products at the time. Check it out for yourselves, I forgot where I encountered it, but I saw similar prints at Xerox.com

PPS: If my posts here are in the way, or not in line with the forum, I'll stop posting and leave.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2008, 09:09:20 PM by EVS »

Offline Nemo492

  • Administrator
  • Hero Dronie #2
  • **********
  • Posts: 769
  • Karma: +30/-1
    • Ovnis-USA
Re: Isaac
« Reply #25 on: September 05, 2008, 09:32:57 PM »
You're not "in the way", but most welcome.
http://ovnis-usa.com
The only motivation for the DRT is finding the truth.

Offline mgrandin

  • Full Dronie
  • ***
  • Posts: 29
  • Karma: +9/-0
Re: Isaac
« Reply #26 on: September 05, 2008, 10:23:18 PM »
You're not "in the way", but most welcome.

I agree "EVS":s posts are among the very most interesting
in this forum and cannot understand why he wrote as he
did - if he was serious.  Perhaps an error in his Xerox
printing machine    ???

Offline leviathan

  • Major Dronie
  • ******
  • Posts: 290
  • Karma: +22/-0
    • L E V I A T H A N
Re: Isaac
« Reply #27 on: September 05, 2008, 11:43:48 PM »
Quote
PS: The layout of the LAP is quite similar to the layouts for other Xerox products at the time. Check it out for yourselves, I forgot where I encountered it, but I saw similar prints at Xerox.com

PPS: If my posts here are in the way, or not in line with the forum, I'll stop posting and leave.

EVS, please never do such a thing.  Your posts are excellent and thought provoking.  They could not be more needed in my opinion.  Do not even let this enter your mind.  The DRT needs you and more like you.  Your posts are never in the way, they are always most welcome by me and the DRT.
L E V I A T H A N
We at L E V I A T H A N were banned from the UFO Casebook Forum and it is so sad.
http://livyatan.blogspot.com/

Offline EVS

  • Administrator
  • Hero Dronie #2
  • **********
  • Posts: 538
  • Karma: +26/-0
Re: Isaac
« Reply #28 on: September 06, 2008, 12:18:00 AM »
Thank you for your confidence in me! I'll stay on then, at least until 2012:

http://droneacademy.conforums.com/index.cgi?board=Drones&action=display&num=1220655964

New issue of VonStern Magazine.

Not the positive kind I'm afraid.

Let's cross our fingers nothing happens wednesday the 10th of Semptember 2008 and at December 2012!

Happy reading, and thanks again,

Erik von Stern (EVS)
« Last Edit: September 06, 2008, 12:19:05 AM by EVS »

Offline nekitamo

  • Administrator
  • Major Dronie
  • **********
  • Posts: 224
  • Karma: +28/-0
Re: Isaac
« Reply #29 on: February 26, 2010, 01:46:30 AM »
Looking for something completely unrelated, I accidentally found this website of a - for lack of better description - "real life" Isaac and just spent so much time reading it I don't even remember what I was looking for to begin with. The most interesting part for us here is "The Secret History of Silicon Valley": how in fact the military and intelligence agencies during the Cold War era started the wave of innovation in the Valley much earlier than commonly known. Here are a few samples from the website, just to "pique your interest" - it reads very much like Isaac's story:

Quote
If I Told You Iâ??d Have to Kill You: The Story Behind â??The Secret History of Silicon Valleyâ?

About a month ago I had one of the strangest phones call of my life. â??Steve my name is Donald xx, and Iâ??m the head of external affairs of the CIAâ??s venture capital firm and weâ??d like you to keynote our conference.â?  CIA?  â??Do you mean the Culinary Institute of America?  And youâ??d like me to do my talk on Customer Development and startups?â?   â??No, weâ??re the other CIA.â?
Quote
The Most Important Company You Never Heard Of

1978. Two years out of the Air Force, serendipity (which would be my lifelong form of career planning) found me in Silicon Valley working for my first company: ESL. If youâ??re an entrepreneur, ESL is the most important company youâ??ve never heard of. If you are a practitioner of Customer Development, ESL was doing it before most us were born. If you think the Cold War turned out the right side up (i.e. Communism being a bad science experiment) ESLâ??s founder Bill Perry was moving the chess pieces. And no one who really knew could tell you.
Quote
Youâ??re Hired, Youâ??re Fired.

My first job in Silicon Valley: I was hired as a lab technician at ESL to support the training department. I packed up my life in Michigan and spent five days driving to California to start work. (Driving across the U.S. is an adventure everyone ought to do. It makes you appreciate that the Silicon Valley technology-centric culture-bubble has little to do with the majority of Americans.) With my offer letter in-hand I reported to ESLâ??s Human Resources (HR) department. I was met by a very apologetic manager who said, â??Weâ??ve been trying to get a hold of you for the last week. The manager of the training department who hired you wasnâ??t authorized to do so â?? and heâ??s been fired. I am sorry there really isnâ??t a job for you.â?
Quote
The Facts: Vacuum Tube Valley â?? Our 100th Anniversary


To my surprise, I discovered that yes, Silicon Valley did start in a garage in Palo Alto, but it didnâ??t start in the Hewlett Packard garage.  The first electronics company in Silicon Valley was Federal Telegraph, a tube company started in 1909 in Palo Alto as Poulsen Wireless.  (This October is the 100th anniversary of Silicon Valley, unnoticed and unmentioned by anyone.)