Author Topic: DroneCam  (Read 17468 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

The Leviathan

  • Guest
Re: DroneCam
« Reply #30 on: March 12, 2013, 04:12:08 AM »
Why not get funding from UFOCB. I am sure they would help a fellow member.

Offline thelmadonna

  • Junior Dronie
  • **
  • Posts: 23
  • Karma: +1/-1
Re: DroneCam
« Reply #31 on: March 12, 2013, 05:14:21 PM »
Hey there Reasoner, this is a good enough camera site for looking at skies. Before Homeland Security it was more widespread and on a different link. It was totally down for a long time, so I am thankful for little mercies, meaning its better than nothing. 

http://www.weatherimages.org/weathercams/usa.html
« Last Edit: March 12, 2013, 05:20:56 PM by thelmadonna »

The Leviathan

  • Guest
Re: DroneCam
« Reply #32 on: March 12, 2013, 06:07:23 PM »
If you accept the drone as having the ability to become invisible, then consider it is doing just that. Will it therefore lift it's guard for any to catch a look again! I would not count on it.
« Last Edit: March 12, 2013, 07:13:08 PM by The Leviathan »

Offline Reasoner

  • Newbie Dronie
  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • Karma: +0/-5
Re: DroneCam
« Reply #33 on: March 12, 2013, 07:15:54 PM »
Thank you for that find, Thelmadonna! I'll probably look through that occasionally, but I was hoping more to build my own system, and perhaps link up with other people to form a sort of web of eyes in the sky. Imagine catching the same image from multiple sources. What might be interesting to do is to find out from that weather cam site what equipment they use... maybe I can find some of it for myself on the cheap.

The Leviathan

  • Guest
Re: DroneCam
« Reply #34 on: March 12, 2013, 08:58:46 PM »
You should do just that. I doubt you capture anything but we will always stand ready to analyze any and all you do. The game is quite fun. I remember your post on UFOCB and resent it highly.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2013, 01:31:25 AM by The Leviathan »

The Leviathan

  • Guest
Re: DroneCam
« Reply #35 on: March 14, 2013, 02:35:47 PM »
EQ, excusez-moi,I HAVE A COUPLE OF THINGS TO CLEAR UP>>>>#1.Darnitall...I lost Sidds new or newish handle ABD address...stupidomio!I wanted to asskim:"Tag Sidd...my Droneish (pronounced 'droneeeeeeeeeeeeeessssch') German is rusty, but shouldn't OLTISSIS be spelled over there: OLTIÃ?IS? " A quote repeated by Reasoner on UFOCB. THIS WAS AFTER SYS SAID IT HAD ALL ENDED THERE.  RIDICULE OF A FORMER POSTER I THINK, NO?

Offline algae

  • Senior Dronie
  • ****
  • Posts: 65
  • Karma: +4/-0
Re: DroneCam
« Reply #36 on: June 29, 2013, 06:23:06 AM »
DroneCam Winds Down After 8056 Hours

On June 6, 2013, DroneCam was shut down to allow some home remodeling. The work has been going on for three weeks now, and the lapse in coverage would certainly upset the statistics bearing on any conclusions I could make. Therefore, let's see what conclusions can be drawn from the data that was collected in the 96,670 30-second observations amounting to a span of nearly one year.

Assumptions
Since the habits of drone craft are not known, we must assume that all locations have an equal chance of visitation, so we can then use laws of probability based on a Gaussian distribution. We don't know if their range is the California Diamond, the USA, or the whole world. The California Diamond has vertices at Big Basin, Campbell, NASA/Ames, and Santa Cruz comprising 1365 square kilometers. The Continental USA comprises 9.37 million square km, and the Earth is 3.6x108 sq km. I assume DroneCam had a good view of 1 sq km. Let the area under discussion be designated A.

We also don't know how long they dwell over any one site. Many reported sightings lasted several minutes. Due to my use of 15X time lapse photography I felt that 30 seconds was the shortest visitation I would be able to reliably detect. Let this dwell time be designated t. There are (24*3600)/t = 2880 observation opportunities per day per site or (8056*3600)/t = 96,670 observations for DroneCam.

We don't know how many Drones are visiting, but we can account for varying numbers in the math. Let the number of Drones visiting Earth be designated Q.

By the time the chances PN of observing an event reach 50% even an unlucky sort like me would succeed after a few days of observing. We need to compute the required number of observations N when PN = 0.5.

Observation
In short, no Drone was seen. Actually no UFO of any standard description was seen. I would like to re-compute these findings with an educated guess for Q, even if it includes non-Drone craft.

Conclusion
The probability of looking up in the sky for one 30-sec observation and seeing a Drone may be computed as P1 = Q/A. If N observations are required the probability is PN = P1(1-P1)N-1. Solving for N we get N = 1+ln(PNA/Q)/ln(1-Q/A).
 
I used a spreadsheet to solve for N given A, Q=1, and PN=0.5. Negative results were shrugged at.
Area under Discussion     Area sq km       N number of observations
California Diamond          1365                                            8,905
Continental USA              9.37 E6                              143,000,000
Planet Earth                    3.60 E8                           6,843,000,000

DroneCamâ??s 96,670 observations were more than enough to spot a single Drone flitting around the California Diamond. In fact, using â??what-ifâ? analysis, DroneCamâ??s observations should have been enough to confirm 837 Drones buzzing the USA, enough to suspect 32140 Drones swarming planet Earth.

Of course the assumptions were drawn pretty broadly, but this analysis may be used to establish an upper bound on the number of 'visitors' in the air, just as a sighting would have established a lower bound. May you have better luck than I.
~algae





The Leviathan

  • Guest
Re: DroneCam
« Reply #37 on: June 29, 2013, 07:48:14 PM »
No Drones. Past, present, future. The opportunity was lost. The skeptic prevailed as should be.

Offline algae

  • Senior Dronie
  • ****
  • Posts: 65
  • Karma: +4/-0
Re: DroneCam
« Reply #38 on: November 15, 2015, 05:59:39 AM »
Sorry to disturb the stillness...

There's a terrific HD camera orbiting the Earth that could be useful for ufo-spotting.
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/iss-hdev-payload

I caught this event, sun-glint, after only a few minutes of watching
http://vid612.photobucket.com/albums/tt209/al_gae/WowThatWasWeird_zpsxr5gluk0.mp4